Capturing the Spirit of Golf in Mexico

CLICK here for a Video of Andy recapping the Spirit of Golf in Mexico while driving along on the “Journey to Olympic Golf”

CLICK here for a Video Interview with Federico Valdez, Executive Director of the Mexican Federation of Golf (FMG).

CLICK here for a Video Interview with Ian Gardner, Rules Expert & Former Executive Director of FMG.

CLICK here for Andy’s visit to the Club Campestre de la Ciudad de Mexico (CC of Mexico City)

CLICK here for Andy’s visit to the Club de Golf Mexico (Golf Club of Mexico)

More videos, pictures, & posts coming… what would you like me to write about?

 

Par-5 Sixth hole with President Aleman tree guarding the green. Like President Eisenhower's tree on the 17th at Augusta National Golf Club.

Par-5 Sixth hole with President Aleman tree guarding the green. Like President Eisenhower’s tree on the 17th at Augusta National Golf Club.

Miguel Alemán Valdés (Wiki) served as the President of Mexico from 1946 to 1952. As a successful attorney, his first practice was in representing miners suffering from silicosis. He won two notable legal victories in defending workers against corporations. The first was in securing compensation for dependents of railroad workers who were killed in revolutionary battles; the second was to gain indemnities for miners injured at work. These victories gained him great favor with Mexico’s labor unions.

Alemán ran for President in 1946 as candidate of the PRI (Party of the Mexican Revolution (an earlier name of the party later known as the PRI), and was the winner of the elections held on July 7 of that year, defeating former foreign minister Ezequiel Padilla to become the first non-military candidate to win the presidency of Mexico. He was inaugurated as President of the Republic on December 1, 1946[5] and served until 1952.

As president, Alemán pursued industrial development, increasing the extension of the nation’s rail network, improving highways, and constructing a number of major schools. To accomplish this, he negotiated a major loan from the United States in 1947. Alemán and U.S. President Harry S. Truman rode in a parade in Washington that attracted an estimated 600,000 well-wishers.[7

He also worked extensively on irrigation and farming, greatly expanding the national production of rice, sugar, bananas, coffee, oats, and pineapples. In 1947 he initiated a huge project to control floods and generate hydroelectricity in the state of Oaxaca, culminating with the opening of the Miguel Alemán Dam in 1955.

He gave women the right to vote in municipal elections during his term, and in 1952 elevated Baja California to state status. He played a major role in the development and support of the city of Acapulco, which is now well known all over the world as one of the principal tourist destinations in Mexico and Latin America.

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