Kaleigh Tefler & Kyle McClatchie, Olympic Golfers for Australia!

South Africa's Kaleigh Telfer will be competing in the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games for Australia.

South Africa’s Kaleigh Tefler will be competing in the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games for Australia.

Kaleigh Tefler and Kyle McClatchie will represent Australia in golf at the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games. They will be coached by Gavin Raynolds. I wasn’t able to find much information on Kaleigh but below is a great article on Kyle from the South African Golf Association. I like one of his ‘bucket list’ quotes- “One of my dreams is to fist pump on the 18th green at Augusta to win the Masters.” Do kids that young have ‘bucket lists’? Shouldn’t they be ‘shake the rattle’ lists? We might be seeing the next Karrie Webb and Adam Scott competing in Nanjing and who knows maybe they both make the putt to win the Olympic Golf Gold Medal in 2020?

Click here for information on Kaleigh Tefler.

Click here for RISING STARS – KYLE McCLATCHIE article.

17 Mar 2014

South Africa's number two ranked junior, Kyle McClatchie; credit Dale Boyce
South Africa’s number two ranked junior, Kyle McClatchie; credit Dale Boyce

In our series introducing the South African Golf Association’s future generation champions, we caught up with the country’s current number two ranked junior, Kyle McClatchie.

In both individual and team events, the young upstart from Ekurhuleni underlined his growing stature in a breakthrough season last year and, if his performances in early 2014 are anything to go by, local golf fans will definitely see more from this promising golfer.

McClatchie began the 2013 season with victory in the Central Gauteng U-23 Open Championship at Glenvista, then claimed a play-off win in the Reading Junior Classic and delivered an outstanding performance in his debut for the South African Junior side that defeated the SAGDB and a team from Scotland in the annual Triangular at Rankpark in February.

He reached the semi-finals of the Nomads SA Boys U-19 Match Play and claimed the runner-up spot in the Stroke Play Championship at Benoni Country Club in April and rode that wave of confidence to helping Ekurhuleni to a runner-up finish in the A-Section at the South African U23 Inter-Provincial.

In September, the Serengeti Golf & Wildlife Estate celebrated his debut on the senior team by helping Ekurhuleni to A-Section promotion at the SA Inter-Provincial Championship, sponsored by Tempest.

The King Edward VII School learner continued his winning ways alongside his KES team mates to beat Southdowns College and win the Retief Goosen SA High School Championship, in association with IMG.

McClatchie also delivered an outstanding performance in his international debut at the seventh Italian International Under-16 Championship. After helping South Africa to a runner-up finish in the Nations Cup, the young gun carried his form to a joint third place finish at the Golf Club Biella Le Betulle.

He launched his 2014 season with a top 10 finish at the first NOom event at Royal Durban Golf Club before defeating Limpopo’s Hennie du Plessis in a play-off for the Dr Bam title.

He led a South African team to victory in a two-day Test against the French at his home course, Serengeti Golf and Wildlife Estate, and made a big contribution to the SA Junior side’s victory in the annual Triangular at Randpark against a Scottish side and an Elite Team from the SAGDB.

This April, McClatchie will travel to Zambia with Jovan Rebula, Du Plessis and Altin van der Merwe where the team hope to claim South Africa’s 16th consecutive title in the All-Africa Junior Golf Challenge.

While McClatchie’s record speaks for itself, we dug a little deeper to find out more about the teenager on, and off, the golf course.

Q: Are you the sort of golfer who sets yearly goals? If so, what goals did you set for yourself to achieve in 2013? What are your long term goals and how do you hope to achieve them?
KM: Yes, I definitely set goals every year. In 2013, I set goals to improve my stroke average and all aspects of my game. I desperately wanted to make the Under 16 team to go to Italy to experience competitive international golf, which I achieved. I also wanted to make the Ekurhuleni Premier IPT team, which I also achieved.
My long term goals are to be a pro golfer who can compete around the world. I hope to achieve this by setting goals and improving year by year and always believing in myself.

Q: Tell us something most people don’t know about you.
KM: Most people know me as a golfer, but I don’t think many know that I’m a bit of an academic, too. (McClatchie achieved an A-average at the end of 2013).

Q: How tough is the transitioning between the junior and open amateur circuits? Tell us a little about the differences between the two circuits, what are most difficult obstacles to overcome and how things are going as you head into the new season?
KM: The Junior Circuit is unbelievably competitive and you know your rivals so well, whereas the amateur circuit is a little easier because the expectations from your competitors are lower and you don’t have much to lose. I am still young and don’t play a lot of senior amateurs, but it is nice to experience four days of competitive golf with cuts to see what I can expect in the future.
This year I really would like to make the S.A. team to go to Japan…that is a big goal and something that I am working hard towards achieving. I will be playing a few amateur events as well this year, but I always try and keep a balance between golf and school, so I need to pick the events that I would like to play in carefully.

Q: Describe the best meal you’ve had while on the road and where you had it.
KM: I was playing in the SA Boys U-15, and my dad took me to a restaurant in Hout Bay and let me order a Lobster Thermidore…best mean ever!

Q: If a song was played at the first tee, what song would be played for you?
KM: The Fighter by Gym Class Heroes. The words are very powerful.

Q: Tell us about your career highlights, especially the treasured memories.
KM: I think finishing 3rd in Italy after being seven over after the first seven holes will stay in the memory banks for quite some time, because it really showed a lot of character for me. Also playing some of the best golf of my life at SA Boys Under-19 and finishing second. One of my other fond memories was playing with my best friend, Jovan Rebula, in SA Boys U-15 and shooting 71 in howling wind and rain at Somerset West. And the eagle at the second play-off hole to win Dr Bam, my first National Order of Merit title.

Q: In your opinion, what are the strengths of your game? And what would you describe as the weaknesses of your game, or aspects that you still have to give attention to?
KM: I drive the ball well and believe I’m one of the best ball strikers in the junior game. I’m also very consistent from week to week. My weaknesses are wedges and that needs a bit of work.

Q: What is your favourite home-cooked meal?
KM: My dad’s baked chicken and bacon pasta. It’s a real treat in the McClatchie household.

Q: Do you think the future of South African golf is in good hands? Who among the crew of amateurs out there at the moment do you think will be our future Major winners?
KM: Yes I do think it is in good hands. Our age group is very strong and I can see many possible major winners. Names that come to mind are Tristen Lawrence and Jovan Rebula. It will also be interesting to see how the careers of Haydn Porteous and Brandon Stone progress.

Q: What advice would you give youngsters just starting in the game?
KM: I would tell youngsters to always work hard at the game and try to enjoy it as much as possible.

Q: Is your glass half full or half empty?
KM: I think of myself as a positive person, so I would say half full.

Q. What is still on the bucket list for Kyle McClatchie?
KM: I would like to finish my junior career at number one and my amateur career at number one. One of my dreams is to fist pump on the 18th green at Augusta to win the Masters.

Bubba, Kuchar, Tiger & Spieth are Olympic Golfers (as of now)!

The World Cup in Brazil has been over for three days!

There are 751 days until the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro!

Aerial shot of the Olympic Golf Course, circa early July 2014, before sodding began. Photo Credit: Golfweek.com

Aerial shot of the Olympic Golf Course, circa early July 2014, before sodding began. Photo Credit: Golfweek.com

Olympic Golf really starts this week with the British Open at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in the town of Hoylake in England. Why? Because the qualification process, namely the Official World Golf Rankings (OWGR) is a two year “rolling” period and that period begins with the 2014 British Open Championship.

The International Golf Federation (IGF), whose members are all countries around the world that play golf, is the official golf governing body interfacing with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the 2016 Summer Olympics. They held a press conference on Monday to present the details of the qualification process and the status of the new Olympic Golf Course being built in Rio de Janeiro. I have excerpted key quotes and included the full transcript below. Suffice it to say there are lots of interesting angles to the simple process of getting the world’s best golfers to compete for an Olympic Gold Medal.

Bubba Watson, Matt Kuchar, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth would represent the United States in the Olympics if today’s date was July 11th, 2016. Interestingly, even though they are in the OWGR Top 15 and would compete for any other country, Jim Furyk, Phil Mickelson and Zack Johnson would not be American Olympic Golfers due to the qualification limits of four per country from the Top 15. Actually if they were Australian, Zack would be out because they already have two higher ranked players to go with Furyk and Phil in the Top 15- No. 1 Adam Scott and No. 6 Jason Day.

Ditto for the Rolex Ranking and Stacy Lewis, Lexi Thompson, Michelle Wie and Christie Kerr being America’s Women Olympic Golfing Foursome in Rio. Paula Creamer, Angela Stanford, and Lizette Salas are ranked in the Top 15 but eliminated by the cap of 4 golfers per country in the Top 15 (cap is 2 golfers per country otherwise).

Confused? Well wait until July 2016 and the last week of qualifying because there are some trumping twists included such as at least one man and at least one woman from the host country (Brazil) and at least one player for each of the five continental units- Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Know anyone from Oceania? Then there is the dual citizenship nationality declarations and IOC drug testing rules. Stay tuned for updates here on the Journey to Olympic Golf!

What about the Olympic Golf Course? Great design by Gil Hanse. There is sand, sod, sprinkling water and two southern hemisphere growing seasons until the local winter of 2016 when the Summer Games will be staged. Now I am confused but so excited to be only two years out from Olympic Golf being played in my lifetime (hopefully that it will and that I will be here to see it)!

Congratulations to the IOC, IGF and Bubba, Kuchar, Tiger and Spieth. Play well in the Open and for the next tw0 years! Grow grass grow in Rio de Janeiro!

Excerpted Quotes:

Anthony Scanlon, Ty Votaw and Peter Dawson at Monday, July 14th, 2014 press conference. Photo Credit: Golfweek.com

Anthony Scanlon, Ty Votaw and Peter Dawson at Monday, July 14th, 2014 press conference. Photo Credit: Golfweek.com

Dawson: “Olympic golf was the biggest grow-the-game opportunity”

Dawson: “Olympic golf is right on the horizon now. It seemed a long way off just a year or so back, but now it’s in front of us.”

Dawson: “The field for the men’s competition and for the women’s competition will both be of 60 players. And both competitions will be 72-hole stroke play.

Dawson: “The (Offical World Golf Rankings OWGR) rankings that count will be the ones that are published this coming weekend after The Open Championship, and they will go through for two years until the 11th of July 2016. Players in the top 15 in the world, as of 11th July 2016, will be eligible for sure, except that no more than four of those from any one country will be eligible to get in. Then we’ll reach down through the Olympic rankings or through the rankings… until we fill the field of 60 players for men and 60 players for women, with a limit of no more than two per country, unless you have more than two in the top 15. However, there are some caveats to that, and that is that there will be a space for at least one man and at least one woman from the host country, and we will also have to ensure that there’s at least one player for each of the five continental units, recognized by the IOC, that’s Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania.”

Dawson: “The current count, if the Olympics were to be played, determined by today’s World Rankings… is about 35 countries for the men and about 33 for women.”

Scanlon: “When the rankings commence next week, the players were made aware that the rankings were starting. We encouraged them to nominate their nationality this week… Well, if they want to change their nationality, it was recommended they do it now…

Dawson: “We didn’t think it would be fair for switch nationalities halfway through the ranking process, just because they would have more chance to play for one country than another… if they haven’t already declared their nationality, and it’s no different than what they have on the World Golf Rankings, there’s no reason for them to change it.”

Dawson: “It’s the Olympic ranking at the 11th of July 2016 that is going to be the one that defines who gets into the games.”

Votaw: “The irrigation system is completely installed on seven holes and partially installed on five others… As we have begun sodding, we have planned to sod nine holes at this point in time, sprig the remaining holes with potential for sodding as needed. Our plan is to have all of the grassing completed by late October-early November of this year… we think that by meeting this schedule, we will have two full growing seasons, which should present optimum conditions for us going forward for the games in 2016… We’ve sodded a couple of holes, so you need to have a little water to make that happen. So water is flying, yes.”

Votaw: “I want to take a moment to commend Gil Hanse and his team and the work that they have done as the architect of the golf course. From all accounts, from everyone who has seen the routing, the design, the rough shaping and the piece of land we have to work with, those who have seen it and those who know what they’re talking about feel this golf course has the potential to be very special, perhaps one of, if not the most, iconic venues of the 2016 games.”

Votaw: “We feel that the landowner/developer needs to continue doing what he’s doing over the last few months to continue this momentum and move from a construction stage into a grow-in and operational and maintenance stage. If they do that we feel that this schedule is certainly achievable.”

Official World Golf Ranking (OWGR) World Ranking Points:

The World Ranking Points for each player are accumulated over a two year “rolling” period with the points awarded for each event maintained for a 13-week period to place additional emphasis on recent performances.

Ranking points are then reduced in equal decrements for the remaining 91 weeks of the two year Ranking period. Each player is then ranked according to his average points per tournament, which is determined by dividing his total number of points by the tournaments he has played over that two-year period.

There is a minimum divisor of 40 tournaments over the two year ranking period and a maximum divisor of a player’s last 52 events.

CLICK here for the full July 14, 2014 IGF transcript.

Peter Dawson, President of the IGF, Chief Executive The R&A

Anthony Scanlon, Executive Director of the IGF

Ty Votaw, Vice-President of the IGF, Executive Vice President, Communications and International Affairs of the PGA Tour

HOYLAKE, ENGLAND (Monday of the 2014 British Open)

MALCOLM BOOTH: Ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon. Thank you for joining us for this International Golf Federation press conference on the subject of Olympic golf. I’m joined at the top table by Peter Dawson, who is the president of the IGF, as well as his day-to-day role as the chief executive The R&A. Ty Votaw from the PGA Tour executive, who is the vice-president of the IGF, and Antony Scanlon, the executive director of the IGF. We are going to take some questions on Olympic golf. I’m sure you have a number of those. Before we get into that, I’m going to ask Peter Dawson to open up with a few opening remarks.

PETER DAWSON: Thank you, Malcolm. May I echo Malcolm’s welcome to you all. Thank you all for being here. We thought we would take the opportunity, as you are all here for The Open Championship, to update you on International Golf Federation and Olympic matters. And I thought it might be worth just recapping briefly on what has brought us to this position today, when we’re announcing that we’re within two years now of the start of the Olympic games, almost, and that our qualification process is about to begin. As you all know, golf was in the Olympic games in the past, in 1900 and 1904, and that wasn’t repeated in 1908. The history of that is unclear, but I know The R&A gets the blame for that from time to time, but it is a long time ago. So why did we go for it this time? And the answer is it was the small countries, where golf is a relatively minor sport, who said to us repeatedly, look, if we can get golf into the Olympic games, it will revolutionize the coverage, the exposure the game gets in our countries and it will galvanize government help and assistance. And it became clear to us that Olympic golf was the biggest grow-the-game opportunity that was available. And that it would also, we thought, enhance golf’s competitive landscape. So we decided it was a good thing, with the support of all these nations. And we had to find a way of interacting with the International Olympic Committee, the IOC. All sports, as you know, have International federations that are part of the Olympic family. And Golf looked around and we had the International Golf Federation, which was responsible, for the world amateur team championships, but had in its membership all of the countries that played golf around the world. And we used that vehicle to bring the professional game and the Major championships into the IGF, because the IOC had made it clear to us that it was going to be professional golf or nothing, if we were going to be successful with our Olympic bid. That was duly formed, and is now a very effective, functional organization. It’s supported largely by seven of the major bodies in the game, both with personnel and with money, but it’s very ably led by Antony Scanlon, on my far right, who is the executive director. Through this process we had immense support from some big names in the game. To name a few, Annika Sorenstam and Jack Nicklaus were very instrumental. Colin Montgomeie and Annika came along when we presented to the IOC executive board. When we finally presented to the whole session of all the IOC members, Padraig Harrington, Matteo Manassero, Suzann Pettersen and Michelle Wie came with us and played a huge part in golf successfully being voted back onto the games. Now we’ve got two years to go. Olympic golf is right on the horizon now. It seemed a long way off just a year or so back, but now it’s in front of us. And we’re announcing today the exact details of the qualification criteria, which will apply for players being eligible to play in the Olympic games. These have been broadly announced in the past, and there’s nothing much new in them, but I think it’s worth going through them in some detail, because there are some points of clarification. The field for the men’s competition and for the women’s competition will both be of 60 players. And both competitions will be 72-hole stroke play. We will be publishing weekly from now on an Olympic ranking, which will show you as the weeks go by if the Olympics, were to be played now, who would be eligible. And this of course will change over the next two years. And it’s the Olympic ranking at the 11th of July 2016 that is going to be the one that defines who gets into the games. Players in the top 15 in the world, as of 11th July 2016, will be eligible for sure, except that no more than four of those from any one country will be eligible to get in. Then we’ll reach down through the Olympic rankings or through the rankings, and the Olympic rankings are absolutely based on the Official World Golf Rankings, as you know. We’ll reach down through those rankings until we fill the field of 60 players for men and 60 players for women, with a limit of no more than two per country, unless you have more than two in the top 15. However, there are some caveats to that, and that is that there will be a space for at least one man and at least one woman from the host country, and we will also have to ensure that there’s at least one player for each of the five continental units, recognized by the IOC, that’s Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. And those players will be included within the limit of 60. So the rankings that count will be the ones that are published this coming weekend after The Open Championship, and they will go through for two years until the 11th of July 2016. I think we’re going to take questions on this afterwards, but that’s the detail of the qualification process and Ty Votaw is now going to update you on progress at the Olympic course in Rio. Ty?

TY VOTAW: Thank you. Good afternoon, everybody. Before I talk specifically about where we are on the construction, I wanted to perhaps clarify at the outset what the IGF’s role in the construction process is in Rio. When the IOC awards an Olympic games to a host city it’s ultimately the responsibility of the national government of that country in which that city is located, the host city, itself, and the Organizing Committee, in this case, the Rio 2016 Organizing Committee. It’s their responsibility to deliver the games to the athletes in the countries from around the world, and deliver the venues and build the venues. When Rio was awarded the Olympic Games for 2016 we looked at the two golf courses that were in Rio at the time, two private golf courses, and assessed that neither one of them would have been an ideal situation for the IGF and for golf to put its best foot forward. And through conversations and discussions with the national government, the host city, as well as the Organizing Committee, we set upon the location that has ultimately been part of the construction process in Rio 2016′s delivery of the golf venue to us over the past several years. That process started in January of ’10 and while it’s taken us much longer for us to get to this point in time than we would have anticipated or would have liked and there have been frustration along the way, ultimately we’re now at a place where we think over the past several months there’s been significant progress made. And with respect to that progress, the IGF’s role, all along, has been that of simply approving the venue for our competition. We don’t exert an enormous amount of control, any amount of control, only influence, in making sure that the delivery of the venue is one that meets the standards of our sport and of a competition at this level with the athletes involved. As I said, we’re encouraged with the progress to date. The landowner/developer, who is integrally involved in the process along with Rio 2016 now has to move from a construction phase to that of a grow in phase, and ultimately to an operation and maintenance phase to this point in time. As we have begun sodding, we have planned to sod nine holes at this point in time, sprig the remaining holes with potential for sodding as needed. Our plan is to have all of the grassing completed by late October-early November of this year, and by meeting this schedule, assuming that the landowner/developer, will dedicate the resources necessary to go from a construction phase to an operation phase and a growing phase with equipment, manpower and resources, we think that by meeting this schedule, we will have two full growing seasons, which should present optimum conditions for us going forward for the games in 2016. Now, as I said, the current thinking is that we would do nine holes of sod. In the short-term, with the remaining nine being a combination of sodding and sprigging. The irrigation system is completely installed on seven holes and partially installed on five others, and we will install that irrigation system as needed for the grassing and for the sodding. Gil Hanse and his team have been in various stages of shaping holes. While some holes are still in rough shaping, final shaping on fairways, greens, tees and bunkers is ongoing with several holes on the front side being completed. Gil is returning to Brazil this week, and expects to finalize six more greens from a final shaping perspective while he is there. As I said, while we’re encouraged by the recent progress, there is still plenty of work to do, and there’s still plenty of work that needs to be done on the golf course as well as with the supporting facilities. And it’s critically important that we remain on track with the schedule for us to meet the October-November time frame that I mentioned. Finally, I want to take a moment to commend Gil Hanse and his team and the work that they have done as the architect of the golf course. From all accounts, from everyone who has seen the routing, the design, the rough shaping and the piece of land we have to work with, those who have seen it and those who know what they’re talking about feel this golf course has the potential to be very special, perhaps one of, if not the most, iconic venues of the 2016 games. But again that potential can only be realized if the resources, manpower, equipment and attention to detail that’s necessary are brought to the project every day from this point forward by Rio 2016, and the landowner/developer. So with that, Peter, that’s an update on the golf course. I’m happy to answer any questions you might have.

MALCOLM BOOTH: Thank you. Can we open it up to questions.

Q. With that schedule, Ty, is there a chance that there will be a test event before the Olympic games?
TY VOTAW: There will be a test event.

Q. Will there be time to make changes if there’s a test event?
TY VOTAW: Unlikely in that regard, because we need to have at least a year, one growing season, to have a presentation for the test event that makes the golf course acceptable for that level of competition. And we’re going to work our way back from the completion of the golf course, from a grassing perspective to determine, looking at the worldwide golf schedule, as to what an appropriate test event might be in that regard. But you have to work back in time from when the golf course is finished ultimately to decide what is available at that time, one year later, at least. If it is one year later, you’re going to be looking at some time in the late ’15-early ’16 time frame, which would inhibit any significant changes. We would learn things, perhaps, but not — that time frame is going to be very different than the time frame in August, when the games are held, in terms of daylight, temperatures, wind conditions, et cetera. But we will have a test event. It’s just a question of when the golf course gets completed will determine how that gets selected.

PETER DAWSON: I think it’s worth adding that a test event is not just to test the golf course. It’s to test the scoring system, the transportation, the logistics, just as much as the course, itself.

Q. Have you got any concerns that the format, four rounds of stroke play, some players will think there’s just more of the same? And also, in terms of scheduling, it’s very clear that around that spell, are you fully relaxed about how that’s going to work or do you think it could cause a problem for some of the golfers?
PETER DAWSON: Well, to take you back to when we were bidding to get golf into the Olympic games, and at that time we had to be certain and had to be able to assure the IOC that we had player support. And we did speak to a lot of players at that time, and it came across to us very strongly that the players would support a 72-hole stroke-play event, for a number of reasons. They felt it was how golf championships are traditionally determined in the professional game. The Major championships are all like that; the best way to determine a champion. Television, quite likes 72-hole stroke play, because of the predictability of timing and so on. So in order to get golf into the games and given that we needed player support, we took that advice and bid, based on 72-hole stroke play. When we see what happens in 2016 and how successful the golf event is and how strongly we become regarded in the Olympic movement, I think there may be room for a discussion and a review of the format. But the reasons for doing it this way in 2016 were very sound in my view. The second question about the schedule for 2016, yes, it is tight, no question about that. All the Major championships are to play, all the World Golf Championships to play, Ryder Cup year, if I remember rightly, and so on. Wimbledon moving back a week, a week later, has complicated that as far as The Open Championship is concerned. And, yes, it is going to be tight, but discussions on that are still proceeding, and we have nothing specific to announce at this time but we will get it done.

Q. Is there any type of a contingency plan for a golf course in case later on this year there’s any type of a catastrophic interruption, be it weather, politics, what have you? And secondly, is there any concern, as you basically show off to the IOC, why golf should be voted in permanently, that the idea of building a golf course requires so much that it might not be worth it?
TY VOTAW: Well, as far as contingency plan, I think we’re in no different place than all the other sports in the Olympic games for Rio 2016 and the readiness and preparedness of Rio. 753 days out between now and the start of the games is something that I know there’s been a lot of discussion, questions about. Certainly there was with respect to the World Cup, with respect to Sochi. And there are contingency plans. What they are, is not something we’re going to share right now, but there are contingency plans based on catastrophic, if you will, but if that happens we’re in the same boat with everybody else in that regard. And we feel good about where we are to date such that absent those catastrophic things, we’re going to be moving forward with this golf course. But, yes, we do have plans in place, but we’re not going to tell you what they are.

PETER DAWSON: On the second part of that question, of course not every bid city would have to build a golf course. There are many cities with golf courses which would be more than adequate for major golf competitions, such as the Olympic games. And I think you’ll probably find when we come around to Tokyo in 2020 that that’s the case.

Q. Having seen all the last-minute preparations for the World Cup, where does this confidence come that this golf course will be ready in time? At the moment it looks like a construction site, with aerial photographs taken two weeks ago. They’re miles and miles away from sort of operational stage. I don’t see it being ready anywhere near in time. So you must have a golf course, not far from the hotel was in Barra as a contingency plan.
TY VOTAW: I’m not quite sure what photo you’re referring to. I know there was a flyover in June, and that was before we began sodding. So I think if you would go there today, it would look much better than what you saw two months ago.

Q. It was taken a week ago. It was in The Times. They flew over the course, and it looked like a construction site.
TY VOTAW: We have people on the ground, not in the air every day, that we know what the progress is.

Q. It’s amazing confidence in somebody that’s been to Brazil. I wish you luck.
PETER DAWSON: All I can say to that is that progress has been doing that recently (gesturing upwards). It is so much faster now per month than it was a year ago, and it’s accelerating. But there’s no complacency there, it’s tight.

Q. The design was Gil Hanse was going to stay in Brazil throughout the year I heard a year ago. But now from what you say he visits the place.
TY VOTAW: No, he was never going to stay there for the entire time, he was going to stay there for the entire time that his involvement was necessary. Once you get out of the construction phase and into the maintenance and operation phase, once he’s completed the rough shaping of the greens and the tees and the fairways and the bunkers, his presence there is not required. He and his family stayed there for a period of time in the early part of this process. And he’s come back, because of other projects that he’s involved with.

Q. You said a few minutes ago that he was still checking some of the holes.
TY VOTAW: That’s right. Final shaping, yes. He doesn’t need to live there to do that.

Q. Can you just expand on this test event. Is it a professional event? Amateur event? Is it European Tour or PGA Tour or WGC? What do you have in mind?
PETER DAWSON: I think there are a number of options. I think you’re going to see it’s either a professional event or an elite amateur event. It’s not going to be the Monthly Medal.

Q. (No microphone).
PETER DAWSON: The events that played down there are South American Tour or South American amateur championships.

Q. Was it all conceivable that golf just might not happen at the Olympics for one reason or another?
PETER DAWSON: I don’t think we’re in any more danger of that than any other sport. I think the whole Rio construction project has been looked at very hard by the IOC. It’s having to be accelerated. And I wouldn’t want to single out golf as the most vulnerable in that process, nor am I here announcing that any other sport is vulnerable. It’s a huge undertaking, putting an Olympic games together, especially, I would imagine just after World Cup. And Rio certainly has their work cut out.

Q. I understand the obvious concern, why it was professional, and I’ve got an Olympic background. Do you ever see given that there is a space for some elite amateurs in some of the major competitions, that if it becomes expanded in the future that there would be a spot for developmental, for an amateur as sort of indicated by your countries that wanted golf to be in the Olympics for that reason?
PETER DAWSON: I think the qualification criteria that we’ve announced are going to reach down quite deep into the rankings, obviously. And what might be regarded as golfers who are in a more embryonic stage in their development, and from countries that are not major golfing countries will get into the games. And I don’t really think that’s very different from having an amateur from those countries. It’s a golfer from those countries who is aspiring to bring the game forward in their homeland. We’ve had recent experience of this, in conjunction with the Masters tournament, in the Asia-Pacific Amateur, which is very broadly based in terms of the number of countries that compete. Is it producing excellent champions? Yes. Is it helping develop the game at the lower end? Absolutely. And I see the Olympics very much in that way. Great champions, but also doing a lot of good for the development of golf. And we’re embarking on this, again, in Latin America now, again in conjunction with the Masters tournament and the USGA, to do exactly the same thing in that part of the world, starting in January 2015. So it’s a very similar process, I can I think.

Q. Ty, you mentioned earlier a number of times in your earlier statement that hitting the schedule is dependent on the landowner/developer putting in the financial and physical resources as desired. What assurances have you had that will be the case? Or do you have any concerns at all that the landowner/developer could be one of the key factors here in delaying the golf course being ready?
TY VOTAW: All I can tell you is that over the past three months we have seen an exponential growth in activity associated with — mostly centered around the fact that we had a meeting in March of this year in Rio, with all the stakeholders around the table, where we told them what the stakes were. Since that time there’s been considerable progress. But we recognize that up to that point they had missed six or seven scheduled deadlines. And we reminded them of that and they have, to date, now, been much more productive and efficient in their resources and in their manpower. Obviously the World Cup taking place during the last month or so has slowed down a little bit of the activity in all of Rio, as you could have seen with the television coverage. But as I said, we are much more encouraged today than we were in March. And given those caveats that I mentioned, are certainly real caveats. We feel that the landowner/developer needs to continue doing what he’s doing over the last few months to continue this momentum and move from a construction stage into a grow-in and operational and maintenance stage. If they do that we feel that this schedule is certainly achievable.

Q. (No microphone).
TY VOTAW: We have daily reports. We have people on the ground. The PGA Tour design services and construction services have made themselves available to the landowner/developer. We had people on the ground 20 days in June, 15 days in July where we’re now going through the transition from construction to grow-in and operation and maintenance, and we think that with — we’re committed to continue to do that over the course of the schedule until it’s completed. And if all of those things take place, then we feel this is achievable.

ANTONY SCANLON: Also the City and the Organizing Committee every week are providing a construction schedule to the IOC. So the IOC are constantly monitoring this project, which is their responsibility.

Q. (No microphone).
TY VOTAW: Well, predictions are very dangerous things.

Q. Just on player nationalities, obviously we now know Roy McIlroy has declared for Ireland. Has that uncertainty been resolved to your satisfaction? Are you pleased that uncertainty is gone? And on the issue of nationality, what of players that may have dual nationality, or under the Olympic rules be able to represent a different country? Could they do that if it gave them a better chance?
PETER DAWSON: I understand that Stephanie Meadow came out yesterday to say she was going to play for Ireland as well in the games. I read that, I think well, this morning. I’m going to refer this to Anthony, in terms of our nationality policy.

ANTONY SCANLON: Yeah, the IOC has a nationality policy set to the IGF. And that is clarified to the players that their ability, if they are dual nationals to notify the IGF, who will review the case and in turn notify the tours and the rankings. So that’s been circulated to the players. And any inquiries, such as Stephanie’s or any decision such as Stephanie’s we will review and then ratify.

Q. It cannot be taken for granted who qualifies or who makes it to the Olympics, but will it be a sad moment for IGF, and given the premise on which you have bid for the Olympic games if countries like India or China, are two of the major countries, they don’t make it to 2016? And are you planning anything in the future, like football has, group stages of qualification and things like that? Is it a plan?
PETER DAWSON: The answer to the question is I’d be sad for any country that doesn’t make it, and especially countries like China and India, and I very much hope that they do. The current count, if the Olympics were to be played, determined by today’s World Rankings, I think, is about 35 countries for the men and about 33 for women, if I’m right there, Ty?

TY VOTAW: Yeah.

PETER DAWSON: We’ve got a good spread of countries in there. There’s a good chance for every nation to have a go. And we have also the continental must have at least one country in provisions and the provision for the host nation. In terms of what’s going to happen in the future and possible qualification events for the Olympic games, that’s something that is going to be reviewed once we see how 2016 has gone. We didn’t have time, really, to put in a qualification process this time, that’s why we went for the World Rankings, and it will be something that’s looked at after the 2016 games.

Q. Without going too deeply into the obvious sort of political things that would qualify a person to represent a country in golf in the Olympics, what are the sporting criteria you put in place? Does an athlete have to have represented a country in three previous world championships?
ANTONY SCANLON: The key criteria is that they’re a national of the country. Simple as that. And there are a number of events that we’ve identified that are international events, which are in conformance with the IOC policy, that having represented at that level, would commit that player, who is a dual national, to continue with that country, unless they have good reason not to.

Q. Those events, could you explain it to us, please.
ANTONY SCANLON: Off the list — we have it on our press release for you.

Q. That’s fine, if it’s on the press release. Stephanie Meadow said when she was announcing that she was opting to play for Ireland in the Olympics, said there was a deadline. When is that deadline?
ANTONY SCANLON: When the rankings commence next week, the players were made aware that the rankings were starting. We encouraged them to nominate their nationality this week.

PETER DAWSON: We didn’t think it would be fair for switch nationalities halfway through the ranking process, just because they would have more chance to play for one country than another.

Q. Did they have to or was it recommended to them or urged them to do that?
ANTONY SCANLON: Well, if they want to change their nationality, it was recommended they do it now.

Q. They didn’t have to, necessarily?
ANTONY SCANLON: If they haven’t already declared their nationality, and it’s no different than what they have on the World Golf Rankings, there’s no reason for them to change it.

Q. Just to clarify, you mentioned the irrigation being built out. Is there actually water in the pipes?
TY VOTAW: Yes. We’ve sodded a couple of holes, so you need to have a little water to make that happen. So water is flying, yes.

Q. Anthony, at what point in this process does a player fall under the stricter IOC rules for drug testing? Do you have to know who’s on the team first and then it starts or does it start earlier than that?
ANTONY SCANLON: They’re registered on the registered testing pool by their national Olympic committee. So from that moment forth they’re subject to the wide list of prohibited substances and the testing list. My understanding it’s 13 weeks out from the Olympic games.

MALCOLM BOOTH: Ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much for joining us.
FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

Swaziland’s Nostimilo Kgomo headed to Nanjing to play Golf in the YOG!

Golfer Nosimilo Kgomo from Swaziland will compete in the Nanjing Youth Olympic Games.Congratulations to Nosimilo Kgomo from Swaziland for qualifying for the golf competition at the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China! Kgomo competed with girls from Namibia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tunisia in May at the African Youth Games at the Gaborone Golf Club in Botswana. If you go there, the greens fees are 220 Pulas or about US$25. Maybe I will see you there one day on a ‘Journey to South Africa!’ On to Nanjing Nosimilo!

CLICK here for the Swaziland Olympic and Commonwealth Games Association (SOCGA)

CLICK here for article from the Times of Swaziland.

MUNAVE, KGOMO FOR OLYMPIC YOUTH GAMES IN CHINA

03/07/2014 04:58:00 BY BHEKISISA MAGONGO

MBABANE – The Swaziland Olympic and Commonwealth Games Associations (SOCGA) will send four athletes to the Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China in August.
The quartet will comprise of Taekwondo’s Carlota Munave and Nosimilo Kgomo from golf who have already qualified for the Youth Olympic Preparation Grant in the lead up to the Nanjing Youth Olympics. Both athletes excelled during the recent ANOCA Games held in Botswana in May.
In a press release by SOCGA CEO Muriel Hofer, the event is scheduled for next month.

“The two female athletes will be eligible to receive E15 000 over three months for their preparation for the Nanjing Youth Olympics, including training, coaching fees, access to tournaments, equipment, or any other needs they may have in their preparation activities,” She said. Munave was recently honoured for representing Swaziland admirably by claiming a Bronze Medal at the ANOCA Youth Games in Taekwondo.

Kgomo also attended the ANOCA Youth Games and was placed 10th in the field.  Both athletes will be looking to continue their development as national-level athletes, training diligently, in order to reach new personal bests and improved performances at the 2014 Youth Olympics in Nanjing. The Youth Olympic Games involve competing, learning and celebrating.

A rich and diverse choice of activities will enable athletes and other young participants to learn life-skills, grow in their sporting careers and achieve a healthy lifestyle.

History of Gaborone Golf Club in Botswana:

Before independence in September 1966, golf in Gaborone was played on a nine hole course with eighteen tees that ran around and across the airstrip. The golf section of the Gaborone Sports Club in the village controlled the golf course.

 For security reasons the club was requested to move and with the help of the Botswana National Sports Council it was granted a lease by the Gaborone Town Council for the land the Club now occupies.

Jimmy Russell, a government roads engineer, did the original layout of the course. Gordon Hampton, the then Director of Agriculture, decided that the clearing of the fairways would be the ideal training ground for bulldozer drivers under the supervision of the late Syd Youthed.

Initially the greens were oiled sand that required smoothing down with a scraper before putting and the tees were built of concrete blocks with rubber mating supplied by the Prison’s Department.

 In 1967 the original clubhouse was designed by Peter Harrison and built by Derek Beesley. The old bar is the central part of the present bar area and was open towards the course.

The course has been developed and refined over the last 40 years and is now a fine test of golf in tranquil surrounds with over 80 species of birdlife and a variety of animals that makes every round a pleasure. The lush kikuyu fairways give way to generous 8cm semi rough before the natural Botswana bush makes any wayward shot an adventure all of its own. The greens have been rebuilt and will continue to improve every season. A new variety of cynoden (Greg Norman) has been planted on all 18 greens. They have also been subtly re-contoured to add more interest to the putting surfaces.

The club enjoys an active and healthy social attendance and has a wonderfully relaxed atmosphere. It has hosted the BGU Independence Trophy for 44 years and has hosted the Zone 6 internationals three times, the Botswana Open over 20 times and the Sunshine Tour FNB events many times in  the past. It has also hosted 7 of the last 12 Botswana Nomads National Tournaments and remains the club with the highest membership numbers in Botswana.

A new era in the club’s life began in October 2012 with a P2mil sponsorship from Gaborone Sun to assist the club in redoing it’s greens and upgrading the course in general.  The irrigation system has been upgraded to double row and cart paths are being demarcated.

The locker rooms and change rooms are receiving some much needed attention at the moment. This allows for a more sophisticated and modern look.

The club thanks Gaborone Sun for their very generous sponsorship.

Elizabeth Elmassian and Brett Coletta to play Youth Olympic Golf for Australia

CLICK here for AOC article presented below.

Olivia Mehaffey to Play Youth Olympic Golf for Ireland

Olivia Mehaffey with her caddie in Morroco.

Olivia Mehaffey with her caddie in Morroco.

Rory McIlroy announced on June 18th that he will play for Ireland, not Great Britain, in the Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro in 2016. But he won’t be the first to play Olympic Golf for Ireland, Olivia Mehaffey will as she tees it up in the Summer Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China in August.

Mehaffey set to break new ground in China.

Olivia Mehaffey will make history in China later this year as Ireland’s first female golfer at the Summer Youth Olympic Games.

The sport will make its debut in Nanjing during the August 16-28 tournament – the second Summer Youth Olympic Games – with the Scarva teenager selected thanks to Order of Merit rankings success.

The 16-year-old member of Tandragee Golf Club will compete across 54 holes in the singles then team up with Ireland’s male player for the team event. The overall entry field for Zhongshan International Golf Club is set at 64 players from 32 nations.

“It is such a wonderful honour and I am so excited,” she said. “We will spend some time first in Hong Kong to try and acclimatise then it is down to the real work in China.

“I also feel so proud to be the first female player to represent Ireland in golf.”

Mehaffey has domestic tournaments planned alongside events in Estonia and Slovenia as part of preparations for the China showpiece.

Photograph of Olivia Mehaffey with her appointed caddy in Morocco during the 16-year-old’s Ladies’ European Tour debut. The Scarva teenager will head off to China later this year for the Summer Youth Olympic Games.

Story & Photograph Courtesy of the Portadown Times. Portadown is a town in County Armagh, Northern Ireland.

Kids First to Play Olympic Golf in August 2014!!!

Michelle Wie is an Ambassador for the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games. Photo courtesy of Olympic.org

Michelle Wie is an Ambassador for the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games. Photo courtesy of Olympic.org

Thought Olympic Golf would be played for the first time in 112 years in the Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro?  So did I but am wring. Golf will first be played in the Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China in August 2014. The Nanjing Zhongshan International Golf Course with host the event. Michele Wie, who personally testified to have golf return to the Olympics is a YOG Ambassador. As I learn more about the competition and who will be competing I will let you know. Yogger is the Nanjing YOG mascot.

Youth Olympic Games Coming Soon…

IOC unveils Michelle Wie as YOG Ambassador ahead of golf’s debut at Nanjing 2014

 

The Nanjing YOG mascot NANJINGLELE on the shoulder of Michele Wie. Photo courtesy of Olympic.org

The Nanjing YOG mascot NANJINGLELE on the shoulder of Michele Wie. Photo courtesy of Olympic.org

With fewer than 300 days to go until golf makes its Youth Olympic Games (YOG) debut at Nanjing 2014, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has announced Michelle Wie as a YOG Ambassador.

The American golfer, who was the youngest ever player to qualify for a USGA (United States Golf Association) tournament, aged just 10 years old, will share her advice and experience with the first generation of YOG golfers, while inspiring young people around the world to get involved in sport and embrace the Olympic values.

Michelle, 24, who has achieved two LPGA (Ladies Professional Golf Association) career victories, said about her nomination as a YOG Ambassador: “I feel so honoured to be part of the Youth Olympic Games. I’m hoping to teach young people to have fun with their game, to be competitive, to really want something and to realise the importance of having a dream.”

The golfing prodigy added: “I think it’s really important to inspire young people to take up sport; it’s important to be active and be outdoors. I remember my childhood, playing different sports and rarely being indoors.”

Golf will feature on the sports programme for the Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games ahead of its return to the Olympic Games, in Rio in 2016, after more than a century. Michelle was a key member of the delegation that travelled to the IOC Session in Copenhagen in 2009 to successfully bid for the re-inclusion of golf.

Speaking about her own aspirations to qualify for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, the Stanford graduate said: “I went to the London Olympic Games last year and that really got me inspired. It got me motivated and I’m going to do everything I can. It’s one of my biggest focuses, making the American team for Rio.”

The second edition of the Summer Youth Olympic Games will be held from 16 to 28 August 2014 in Nanjing, China. The programme will feature 28 sports, as well as unique disciplines such as 3-on-3 basketball and 5-a-side hockey, in addition to mixed gender and mixed National Olympic Committee (NOC) events.

Zhongshan International Golf Club.

Zhongshan International Golf Club.

A press conference was held on 21 May by Zhongshan International Golf Club to introduce the preparation for the golf events of the 2nd Summer Youth Olympic Games (Nanjing 2014).

Zhongshan International Golf Club is praised as the most beautiful venue of Nanjing 2014

64 golfers from 32 countries and regions will join the Games. It is understood said that Zhongshan International Golf Club has three 9-hole courses, namely Yishan Course, Yinghu Course and Lanyue Course, and occupies an area of approximately 2.44m square metres. The first two courses are jointly referred to as the ‘northern 18 hole’, which meet international championship standards. The courses will host the golf events of Nanjing 2014, and have previously hosted the Invitational Golf Games of the 10th National Games of the People’s Republic of China, three China Golf Tournaments and the golf events of the 2nd Asian Youth Games, Nanjing 2013 (AYG Nanjing 2013).

One-to-one personal maintenance to improve fully the conditions of the venue

After winning the right to host the events, the Club began upgrading its 27-hole course, including complete replacement of the grass, landscape advancement, hotel expansion and functional clubs advancement. The whole work will be completed before Nanjing 2014.

The venue team has settled in since the beginning of the year, and over half of its members have gained experience from the golf events of AYG Nanjing 2013. As Nanjing 2014 will take place in August, the hottest month days in Nanjing, course maintenance is therefore far more demanding. It is predicated that the temperature of the course will reach 50ºC during the Games. Strong sunlight and humidity will greatly impact the grass and lead to its death. Therefore, the Club has adopted a personal-maintenance system to ensure all 18 greens remain in good condition during the Games. Currently, the venue team is working very hard as the preparation for the Games entering its final stage.

The Club invites the youth to experience golf

Unlike any other event, each golfer is accompanied by a caddie. All caddies of the Games come from Zhongshan, who provide the golfers with the best help and support.

In response to the Nanjing 2014 events taking place during the scorching heat in August, the Club has continued to train intensively the caddies in every aspect since Nanjing 2013, for example, walking through the 18-hole course, which is about 9.5 kilometres, while carrying a golf bag that weighs over 10 kilograms. English training is also the focus of the intensive training, as the caddies will be directly serving golfers from all over the world. Furthermore, the Club provides regularly professional “high-end service training”.

To uncover the mystery veils of the caddies as well as to promote the Nanjing 2014 golf events, the Club will begin to provide complimentary experience activity from today. Youth between 10 and 18 may apply to participate in the “Caddie Experience Day” to be a caddie and experience the unique charm of golf.

Teenagers to play at YOG golf course

Nanjing Zhongshan International Golf Course is recently calling for youngsters to feel the unique charm of golf, a sports event which has been included in the upcoming Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games (YOG).
 
Those aged from 10 to 18 who are interested in golf can apply for the activity in which they will serve as caddies.
Zhongshan International Golf Course, which consists of three nine-hole golf courses and covers an area of 2.44 million square meters, has been renovated to welcome players from around the world.

NANJING, China – November 29, 2012,The Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games Organising Committee (NYOGOC) today unveiled its official mascot: “NANJINGLELE”.

NANJINGLELE is the mascot of the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China.

NANJINGLELE is the mascot of the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China.

NANJINGLELE is inspired by a unique natural feature of the host city known as the “Rain-Flower Pebble” (also translated as “Riverstone”). The design of the mascot takes the typical shape and appearance of this stone but in a creative and artistic way, highlighting the colours from the emblem’s palette. The word ‘lele’ represents the sound of stones colliding together and is pronounced like the Chinese word meaning happiness or joy.

NYOGOC unveiled the official mascot at a grand ceremony held at the Nanjing Olympic Centre, one of the main competition venues for the upcoming Games. More than 4,000 people, including students, locals, government officials and sponsor representatives, attended the ceremony. Olympic Chinese champions Sun Yang, Huang Xu and Wu Jingyu unveiled the mascot with official dignitaries and a group of young people who are working with NYOGOC as advisors.

In a congratulatory letter read during the ceremony, the International Olympic Committee President, Jacques Rogge, said: “The design of NANJINGLELE is truly inspiring and will certainly capture the attention of the world’s youth and older generations alike. Not only does it incorporate aspects of the host city’s majestic local stone, the riverstone, but it is bright and vibrant and sets the tone for a fun, colourful and energetic YOG.”

Li Xueyong, Governor of Jiangsu Province and President of NYOGOC, said: “Mascot NANJINGLELE represents the profound cultural deposit of Nanjing, the collective wisdom of its people and the good wish of a harmonious relationship between human beings and the nature.”

NANJINGLELE was chosen following a nationwide mascot design competition launched by NYOGOC earlier this year. More than 1.2 million students from more than 900 colleges across China participated in the competition.

During the event, Cao Weixing, Vice Governor of Jiangsu Province and Vice President of NYOGOC, presented an award to the winning designer Mr Cui Xinye, 25, a college student.

Yang Weize, General Secretary of CPC Municipal Committee and Executive President of NYOGOC, gave a speech during the ceremony: “As a messenger of the Nanjing 2014 concept and the Youth Olympic spirit, NANJINGLELE will win numerous friends all over the world with its cute and vivid look. It simultaneously sends an invitation to all the young people around the world to take part in Nanjing 2014 and to join in the YOG experience wherever they are .”

Matthew Forbes, Vice Consul-General of Britain,which hosted theLondon 2012 Olympic Games, and Chi Chiew Sum, Vice Consul-General of Singapore, which hosted the 1st Summer Youth Olympic Games in 2010, also expressed their best wishes to Nanjing 2014 and presented their mascots as a gift to Nanjing.

Golf’s Olympic Spirit- 10-12-13 Nephew Corey

 _Corey in M30 6-14-09As I head north to Georgia, the Peach State, I am thinking of another “Peach.” My nephew Corey, who passed last year at the age of 18, after a courageous 3-year battle with cancer. He was nicknamed “Peach” by his brothers and parents. Corey golfed, was proficient at the game, and his favorite golfer was Phil Mickelson. “Peach,” pioneered the way of immunotherapy treatment for his rare form of sarcoma. Even after his death, he is helping others that follow in his footsteps, take many more steps in life than he. My sister Mary and her family and friends are having a “Corey Walk” in Pennsylvania today. Corey will be there in spirit and somehow, I know, factors into the definition of the “Olympic Spirit for Golfers.” This picture of Corey was taken in the Infiniti M30 that I am driving to Rio de Janeiro on a “Journey to Olympic Golf.” “Peach,” feel free to come along for the ride! Uncle Andy

Golf’s Olympic Spirit- 10/11/13 Initial Thoughts

As I begin a “Journey to Olympic Golf” to define the “Olympic Spirit of Golf & Golfers” here are my initial thoughts. Over the course of the three

Jennifer Salles-Cuhna made a splash with me at the YMCA— if golf is like life, maybe swimming is like golf—lifetime journey, progressive stages, stay calm, stay loose, but get the adrenaline going for that one moment in time, th

The First Tee of North Florida impacted me two timesfirst when I visited the Brentwood facility and second when I went to the ‘Taste of Golf.’ Perhaps the Olympic Spirit is innate and comes out more in life than at the Olympics?

Golf’s Highest Honor is being inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Currently there are 147 members. No induction is planned for 2014. The next one is scheduled for the Monday of the 2015 PLAYERS on May 4, 2015.

Golf Channel Article

Press Release from the World Golf Hall of Fame

Mike Reeder CAFMike Reeder gave me a lot of food for thought as I search for the meaning of Olympic Spirit for Golfers. He wears some of it right there for all of us to see- his patriotic shirt. So yes playing for your country, patriotism is surely a part of the Olympic Spirit. I liked when Mike said “you don’t have to be in a military uniform to be a patriot.” With the Olympics though there is less of a sense of competition among nations as there is an individual or a team striving to do their very best, perhaps set a new world or Olympic record to prove we have grown, we have advanced during the last four years.

Leslie & Bobby Weed welcoming HEAL supporters.

Leslie & Bobby Weed welcoming HEAL supporters.

Somewhere in my HEAL experience there is an element of the “Olympic Spirit for Golfers” that I hope to discover on the “Journey to Olympic Golf.” Maybe it has something to do with Bobby Weed being a great golf course architect. Or maybe it is the use of technology where nonverbal autistic children like Lanier are able to communicate with iPADS? Somehow golfers in the 2016 Summer Olympics will reach out with their golfing abilities and touch the world just like Leslie and Bobby have reached out and touched so many through HEAL. Another dimension to ponder as I drive 13,400 miles to Rio de Janeiro…

Andy Fox is OUTFOXING CANCER. The 15-year cancer survivor has a system of Fs, one of which is to be Forward-looking and to “get rid of the rear view mirror.” Sound advice for Olympic golfers and all of us—forget the last shot and focus on what’s in front of us!

PGA  of America

PGA of America is headquarter in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida

Interestingly, golf will return to the Olympics in 2016, the same year the PGA of America will celebrate its centennial. How to capture the “Olympic Spirit for Golfers” from the 27,000 men and women golf Professionals?

About The PGA of America (Source is the PGA of America)

Since its founding in 1916, The PGA of America has maintained a twofold mission: to establish and elevate the standards of the profession and to grow interest and participation in the game of golf. By establishing and elevating the standards of the golf profession through world-class education, career services, marketing and research programs, The PGA enables its professionals to maximize their performance in their respective career paths and showcases them as experts in the game and in the multi-billion dollar golf industry. By creating and delivering world-class championshipsand innovative programs, The PGA of America elevates the public’s interest in the game, the desire to play more golf,and ensures accessibility to the game for everyone, everywhere. As The PGA nears its centennial, the PGA brand represents the very best in golf.

The PGA of America is the world’s largest working sports organization, comprised of 27,000 men and women golf Professionals who are the recognized experts in growing, teaching and managing the game of golf, while serving millions of people throughout its 41 PGA Sections nationwide. Since its founding in 1916, The PGA of America has enhanced its leadership position by growing the game of golf through its premier spectator events, world-class education and training programs, significant philanthropic outreach initiatives, and award-winning golf promotions.

“I am a relic of time when amateur golf was a goal in itself, to be pursued and savored all one’s life, rather than as a step to something else. And I still believe it.”- William C. (Bill) Campbell in 1995 (Source Bill Fields ‘A Gentlemanly Gentleman’ Bunker Article, GolfWorld 9/9/13

Andy:   Golf’s Olympic Spirit is something “in and of itself” in exile for 112 years come the Summer Olympic Games in 2016… just what is it?

“Golf is a both a builder of character and a revealer of character.”- William C. (Bill) Campbell in 2003

Andy:   What character traits define an Olympic Golfer?

Patriotism is defined as devoted love, support, and defense of one’s country; national loyalty.

More videos, pictures, & posts coming… what would you like me to write about?